Helsinki Again! Seidenberg School Launches Year Two of the Product Design Project Research Initiative

Extending last year’s acclaimed partnership with Aalto University in Helsinki, Finland, the Seidenberg School is collaborating for a second year in the Product Design Project (PDP) Based at Aalto University, PDP brings together students from more than a dozen universities around the globe to develop real products for companies including Ericsson, UNICEF, ABB and ExerBlast who are searching for innovative cooperation with the next generation of IT experts. At the start, much attention is directed to the formation of highly motivated interdisciplinary teams.

Extending last year’s acclaimed partnership with Aalto University in Helsinki, Finland, the Seidenberg School is collaborating for a second year in the Product Design Project (PDP) Based at Aalto University, PDP brings together students from more than a dozen universities around the globe to develop real products for companies including Ericsson, UNICEF, ABB and ExerBlast who are searching for innovative cooperation with the next generation of IT experts. At the start, much attention is directed to the formation of highly motivated interdisciplinary teams. A project typically includes all phases of planning, requirements gathering, the creative process, software design, usability and marketing.

Led by Associate Dean Jonathan Hill and Program Manager Wilfredo Pena, Seidenberg Students Drew Cimino (CS ’13), Prachaya Sinsuwan (MS CS ’14), Julie Gauthier (CS ‘15), Michael Cornell (CS ’15), Bryn Haffey (MS CS ’14) and Keith McPherson (CS ’13) were joined by Lubin student Shervin Browne (MBA ’14) and Dyson Communications major Jessie Mishavsky (BA ’13)

Utilizing lessons learned from the concept of distributed teams, the project goes through the phases of  requirements gathering, product design, manufacture, assembly, and testing to create a unique and valuable learning experience. As the sun rises in Australia, students at Swinburne University in Melbourne begin iteration of their specified part of the project, as the day continues at Tianjin University in Shanghai, students continue the process and pass the results to the next stop, the Indian Institute of Technology at Kanpur. The project is then picked up and further developed by students at Aalto University and as the sun moves from Helsinki to New York, Pace University students contribute their day’s work and then conclude their day by passing the baton back to their Australian colleagues. Team meetings are held weekly, via Skype, where students learn to negotiate differences in time, culture and project flow. After a full academic year of designing, coding and building, the international teams gather for a final ‘gala’ presentation in Helsinki where the students celebrate their accomplishments.

“This is truly one of the best educational experiences that I can imagine” said Jonathan Hill. “The students work as a distributed team on a very complex, but ultimately deeply satisfying projects with other top students from around the world. The experiences they have replicate what they will be asked to do as professional developers: ask questions, solve problems, create, get feedback, react to their clients changing needs and learn to negotiate time zones, different cultures and different learning styles”.

“I love my team” said Julie Gauthier, a sophomore computer science major from Connecticut. “I am the developer among mechanical and electrical engineers, designers, and MBA’s. They have been so welcoming and so helpful and I can’t wait to see what we build”.

This year’s collaboration includes the addition of a New York City based start-up which will bring four Aalto students to Pace for a week of on-site research, activities and workshops that support co-creation. Pace University and Exerblast, a digitally enhanced youth exercise and gaming concept, are working together to build new interactive experiences on their website and play space located in Tribeca.   This project will give the students an opportunity to pursue interdisciplinary ideas at the cross point of computer science, engineering production and communications.  Besides working on the project it will also be an opportunity to reciprocate the hospitality they’ve received during their visit to Aalto.  Our visitors will arrive in time to attend a New York Tech Meetup (NYTM) monthly gathering among other events that showcase the thriving tech scene in New York.

If you would like to participate in helping us make this a great experience for our Aalto U guests, stay tuned for information on their arrival.

Seidenberg Student Wins Mobile App Contest

On Thursday, December 6th, an interdisciplinary group of Pace University students gathered together at the new Lubin Entrepreneurship Lab. The occasion? To design innovative mobile apps at the Mobile App Design Contest—an open exhibition in which the finalists were decided by a public vote. Participants included students from computer science, marketing, art, business, and more

On Thursday, December 6th, an interdisciplinary group of Pace University students gathered together at the new Lubin Entrepreneurship Lab. The occasion? To design innovative mobile apps at the Mobile App Design Contest—an open exhibition in which the finalists were decided by a public vote. Participants included students from computer science, marketing, art, business, and more. It was an exciting exhibition, showing off the variety of issues students are able to tackle from a mobile perspective. The ideas ranged from a Pace-based textbook exchange app to an at-your-fingertips concession stand app. Apps were judged based on aesthetic appeal, innovative features, complexity of problem space and ease of use. The winner, Julie Gauthier, designed an app called “We Go Together.” The main goal of “We Go Together” is to act as a socially enhanced scheduling app, allowing the users to share calendars, see what their friends are up to, and to keep up with upcoming local events. She said that, “I worked extremely hard to have a great presentation, because I didn’t know what kind of format it would be, or who would be there. It was a fantastic opportunity for me to gain experience pitching my ideas.” For further descriptions of the apps presented at the Mobile App Design Contest, please visit this page.

Four Seidenberg Students are Finalists in Mobile App Contest

Four Seidenberg students are finalists in the Lubin Mobile App Contest.

The Pace Mobile App Design Contest – Open Exhibition & Vote will be held on Thursday, December 6th 2012, from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Pace Entrepreneurship Lab, 163 William Street 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10038.

Four Seidenberg students are finalists in the Lubin Mobile App Contest.
The Pace Mobile App Design Contest – Open Exhibition & Vote will be held on Thursday, December 6th 2012, from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Pace Entrepreneurship Lab, 163 William Street 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10038.

Congratulations to our Newest Information Assurance Scholars

This fall, three outstanding Seidenberg undergraduates were awarded highly coveted scholarships to prepare for careers in the evolving field of cybersecurity.

This fall, three outstanding Seidenberg undergraduates were awarded highly coveted scholarships to prepare for careers in the evolving field of cybersecurity.

Douglas Kandl (BS/ Information Technology ’14) joined the Department of Defense Information Assurance Scholarship Program (IASP). Current IASP scholars also include John “Vinnie” Monaco (MS/Computer Science’14), Max Wagner (MS/Computer Science ’14) and Christopher Kibble (MS/Information Systems’13).

Marc Kowtko and Luke Babak (BS/ Information Technology ’14) joined the CyberCorps©: Scholarship for Service (SFS), a program funded by the National Science Foundation. Current SFS scholars also include Christopher White, Chris Holowiak (BS/Information Technology ’13) and Allison Llewelyn (BS/Computer Science’13).

These awards are given to highly qualified students interested in pursuing fields of study related to information assurance.  In addition to covering tuition, fees and books, the scholarships provide a generous stipend for living expenses, and opportunities for internships and full-time employment. For program information and eligibility visit: http://seidenberg.pace.edu/ia

Graduate Student’s Assistive Technology Invention Placed into A New Book

Every student dreams of being published before they graduate and demonstrating to the world their achievements and skills, but few students have the opportunity. This Fall semester, however, both Jennifer Simon and Janelle Wallace graduate student’s in the PACE MS in Educational Technology program where selected to have their Assistive Technology invention placed into a new book, Design and Technologies for Healthy Aging (DATHA) as part of a coalition initiative housed at the Center for Assistive Technologies and Environmental Access (CATEA). The DATHA is currently under development by Claudia Rébola, Assistant Professor, Industrial Design, Georgia Institute of Technology. At Pace University as part of the TS642 Computer Hardware, Troubleshooting, and Maintenance class taught by Dr. Jean F. Coppola, Simon and Wallace developed adaptive iPad styles for the hand/arms and head that they call “Smile Gear.”

Every student dreams of being published before they graduate and demonstrating to the world their achievements and skills, but few students have the opportunity.  This Fall semester, however, both Jennifer Simon and Janelle Wallace graduate student’s in the PACE MS in Educational Technology program were selected to have their Assistive Technology invention placed into a new book, Design and Technologies for Healthy Aging (DATHA) as part of a coalition initiative housed at the Center for Assistive Technologies and Environmental Access (CATEA). The DATHA is currently under development by Claudia Rébola, Assistant Professor, Industrial Design, Georgia Institute of Technology. At Pace University as part of the TS642 Computer Hardware, Troubleshooting, and Maintenance class taught by Dr. Jean F. Coppola, Simon and Wallace developed adaptive iPad styles for the hand/arms and head that they call “Smile Gear.”

 

Product Description

We discovered that in certain cases of cerebral palsy and other physical disabilities, patients are not able to use e-Devices to their full capacity because they are physically restricted.  To help solve this problem and also bring a smile to people with disabilities, we have created two touchscreen devices that are cool, colorful, functional, and simple to create.  These friendly self-made adaptive tools are a refreshing change to the cold and uncomfortable metal/plastic pointers that are the norm for alternative tools.  The tools we have developed are inexpensive to make, flexible for different needs and body sizes, and lend themselves to people with disabilities who have difficulty using the iPad or other e-Devices.  These cool & colorful styluses are able to wrap around hands, arms, or the head to point and select apps on touch-screen devices. One special and distinctive feature about our tools is that they are available in different colors and textures even with fun accessories like eyeballs and antenna which transform these styluses into friendly creatures that not only aid those with disabilities, but that also boost their confidence by putting a smile on their faces and making them feel “cool” about using it. 

For more information visit their website

Andrea Taylor, Professor, Volunteering with Digital Interactive Visual Arts Sciences (DIVAS)

DIVAS mission is to “bridge the digital divide by combining media literacy and cultural awareness along with a vast understanding of technology to encourage young women of color to pursue careers in computer science and new media.” In recent studies it has been determined that the Information Technology field is made up of only 35% women and the number of women of color within that percentage is even less. DIVAS for Social Justice is determined to tear down economic and racial barriers to encourage young women of color to become future leaders in their communities and the Information Technology/New Media fields.

DIVAS  mission is to “bridge the digital divide by combining media literacy and cultural awareness along with a vast understanding of technology to encourage young women of color to pursue careers in computer science and new media.” In recent studies it has been determined that the Information Technology field is made up of only 35% women and the number of women of color within that percentage is even less. DIVAS for Social Justice is determined to tear down economic and racial barriers to encourage young women of color to become future leaders in their communities and the Information Technology/New Media fields.

You can find out more about the DIVAS on their website (http://www.divasforsocialjustice.org/) and on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/groups/26315210494/).

Andrea’s role is to help raise awareness of the group, to help with funding efforts and to bring the areas of programming and robotics to the program participants. In November, 6 youth participate in a LEGO Robotics after-school program at the DIVAS headquarters in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, NY.  Ultimately, we are preparing to form a Robotics team to compete next year at the FIRST FLL LEGO tournaments.