Seidenberg represents at CERN Design Factory

In the STEM world, there are few places that will make people gasp with awe. CERN is one of them, and during one special week in December, several Seidenberg staff and faculty were there.

CERN is one of the world’s largest and most respected centers for scientific research. It’s also home to a Design Factory, which this year was the host of International Design Factory Week, an annual meeting of Design Factories around the globe to collaborate, bond, and have a good time with other members of the network.

Why were we there?

Pace University recently opened our very own entrant into the Design Factory Global Network (DGFN) – the NYC Design Factory. The purpose of these factories is to build a space within a community where members can research, collaborate, give and get feedback, and ultimately develop excellent ideas and products that solve problems. They do so using a methodology called Design Thinking, a non-traditional way of working that we hope to bring into the mainstream through NYC Design Factory and across the greater Seidenberg and Pace community.

But back to CERN. Delegates from Seidenberg included Dean Jonathan Hill, Professor Stacey Sarris, and Program Manager Olga Bogomolova. They flew out to Geneva, Switzerland, over the weekend preceding the Dec 12th kickoff.

Checking out CERN

So what did our envoys think? “CERN was the perfect backdrop for a collaborative Design Factory global event given that CERN is proof that anything is possible and that’s what Design Factory is about!” said Professor Stacey Sarris.

“CERN is this amazing, dynamic place with thousands of scientists – most of them physicists with some computer scientists sprinkled in – who are working on some of the largest physics problems in the world today. You can’t not be inspired spending a day there among the world’s top science minds,” Dean Jonathan Hill said.

Minds blown at the LHC and birthplace of the internet

Do you want to collaborate?

45 people from 15 countries attended the event. Olga explained the benefits of having an annual get together. “We all have strengths and areas of focus, so when we get together we can exchange ideas and best practices and brainstorm ways of working together. Because we are so different, we can leverage our differences to create a wholesome experience for our students.

There are 16 universities or institutions around the world that think similarly and practice design thinking, project based learning; we have a similar way of thinking and doing things. By getting to know each other, you learn that if you want to work with an institution in Australia, Korea, China, Columbia, and so on, I can just send someone from that country’s design factory a message and say ‘I have an idea, do you want to collaborate?’

Just knowing that even if you don’t know someone in the country there is an institution of people that think the same way as you… it breaks down barriers. The week is great because we get to meet each other as human beings, which helps us work together.”

Top secret

International Design Factory Week has several goals. The first one is to meet and get to know one another. People were spending 10-16 hours per day with each other, so that wasn’t difficult! The second goal was to come up with a project for everybody to work on together. “There’s so many of us, covering the whole world and different timezones. Coming up with a project to leverage the whole network sounds difficult, but we did it,” said Olga. “It’s top secret.”

Top secret? Yeah, right – we found your Mannequin Challenge video, DFGN! We know what you really got up to! Just kidding – but watch their amazing video below!

Seidenberg students head to Finland for 6th Product Development Project

During the fall semester, six students headed to Helsinki, Finland, for Pace’s 6th year of participation in Product Development Project (PDP). The Finnish destination was the Aalto Design Factory, located at Aalto University.

This was a special trip as it came shortly after Pace University opened our very own Design Factory, the NYC Design Factory located here at Seidenberg School.

ava-posnerOnce they had arrived at the Aalto Design Factory, it was time to get started. Attendees met teammates and participated in PD6 – product development in 6 hours. Everyone was then split into two teams: KONE, an established elevator company, and Seecode, a tech startup.

We chatted with students on each team. Representing KONE was Mansoor Baba Shaik (MS Information Systems). Ava Posner (BS Information Technology) was on the Seecode team. Ava was also busy snapchatting the trip for a Snapchap takeover of the Pace University account.

Each team not only consisfinland-3ted of diverse members but was filled with different levels of expertise based on each member’s background. This worked well because the teams were able to work more efficiently in order to make it a collaborative process.

For the first few days/nights, the team members spent most of their time bonding and getting to know one another. Besides working hard, the students were allowed to explore and experience what it was like to live in Finland. mansoor-baba-shaikOn the following days it was time to get down to work!

The KONE team visited KONE headquarters, where each member of the team had the chance to use the mobile operated elevator which is being tested on and which will become the first mobile operated elevator in the world.

The Seecode team also visited the umbrella company NOMO 3D headquarters.

Teams were assigned tasks to be completed during sprints of PD6, utilizing design thinking methodologies.

finland-2For Seecode, the team was to build a prototype that would be used to scan individual body images in order to help design custom made outfits for buyers throughout the world. The aim is to make online clothes shopping a less uncertain experience: who hasn’t bought their size online only to find it doesn’t fit?

Team KONE had to come up with a product allowing a self controlled drone to deliver packages to customers directly via the building’s elevator. The idea is that a delivery company could program a drone operate an elevator so it can deliver packages to the correct person directly. I shouldn’t come as a surprise that Amazon is involved in this project.

As PDP is a two-part project, students will return to Helsinki for part two in May, 2017. In the meantime, both teams, being spread apart throughout the world, must remain in constant contact to finish their projects before the final presentation.

finland-7“We are excited to be a part of this amazing project and willing to put our 100% effort to achieve the final outcome of the project and present it in the gala”, said Mansoor. “We thank Pace University for selecting us for the Product Development Project and we feel it’s a great honor representing Pace University in a global event.”

 

 

 

Learn design thinking with IBM

Hey, you! Interested in an event at none other than IBM this month? Want to learn a useful new skill? Then check out this workshop!

WHAT: IBM Design Thinking

Design thinking is a human centered approach to complex problem solving. Sounds complicated, but it’s actually a great way of making solving problems simpler. In this workshop, some of IBM’s best and brightest “design thinkers” will train you in this useful technique. You will learn approaches that have you experiencing a new way of thinking that will help you with classes, projects, theses, and much more.

You will receive a certificate for completing this workshop!

WHEN: Friday, March 11, 2016, 10:30am-3:00pm

WHERE: IBM, 294 NY-100, Somers, NY 10589

TRANSPORT: We will have a Pace shuttle departing from the Pace Pleasantville campus at 9:30am and returning at approximately 4:00pm. Students from the Pace NYC campus should plan to arrive @ PLV campus by 9:30am at the latest.

PROGRAM INFORMATION:

This 4 hour workshop will introduce students to a different way of thinking and working collaboratively in order to solve problems.  The workshop will be run by IBM design thinking experts.

Students will be exposed to the design thinking framework and guided to apply the framework to solve a problem – the problem description is included below, though students can also bring in their own problem. Students will have the opportunity to present their ideas/solutions to the their client, town of Germantown. In addition, the students will receive certificates for workshop competition from IEEE, the world’s largest professional association for the advancement of technology.

PROBLEM DESCRIPTION:

The town of Germantown, located in Columbia County NY, is nestled on the east bank of the Hudson River 100 miles north of New York City. Over 2,000 Germantown residents enjoy a quiet, family-centered lifestyle in the country with easy access to the river for boating, fishing and viewing spectacular sunsets behind the Catskill Mountains. Boaters and fishing fans have two access points to the Hudson River:  Cheviot Park off County Rd. 9G and Lasher Memorial Park in North Germantown.

There are several acres of undeveloped waterfront property either owned by the town or the State. The town is interested ideas for utilizing the waterfront land, which takes into consideration the potential high-speed rail that may be built along the Hudson River to link New York City and Albany.

REGISTRATION:

Please register by March 7, 2016 here: http://conta.cc/1pl0MZj

Seats are limited.

QUESTIONS:

Interested students can direct their questions to Andreea Cotoranu, acotoranu@pace.edu or 914-773-3193