The 15th Annual Michael L. Gargano Faculty-Student Research Day

On May 5, 2017, members of the Pace community gathered for the 15th Michael L. Gargano Faculty-Student research day. This year’s conference was dedicated to the work of Frank Rosenblatt, an American psychologist notable in the field of artificial intelligence for the invention of perceptrons, a class of neural networks.

Rosenblatt is also considered the ‘father of Deep Learning,’ as his development of perceptrons has evolved into deep learning networks.

Dean Jonathan Hill makes his opening remarks at the Michael L Gargano Faculty Student Research DayThe Dean of the Seidenberg School, Dr. Jonathan Hill, kicked off the event. “I am delighted to see so many people here today,” he said. “This research day is a brilliant reflection of the doctoral work going on here, the master level research that is taking place, and the undergraduate research that is a hallmark of this School, and indeed the University.”

Dr. Hill spoke about the history of the day, including the decision to name it after Michael Gargano, who he described as “one of the forces of life.”

“He recruited many people [to our DPS program] and served as advisor to them. I think a lot of us have worked overtime to make up for Michael’s loss and to bring the energy that he had.

“The only way we can do that . . . is to be learned, to read widely, and to speak to each other about our work, and create an environment where people can come together and share their work.”

Dr. Hill then introduced Dr. Charles Tappert, who manages the DPS program and organized the day.

Dr. Tappert gave a presentation about Frank Rosenblatt, who had been his dissertation advisor, and deep learning. “Deep learning is now causing a revolution in artificial intelligence,” he said. He argued for Rosenblatt receiving the title of ‘father of deep learning’ – as there are quite a few people up for the name – and spoke about his significant contributions to the field.

Afterwards, the conference began in earnest! It was an extremely packed day, with many students and faculty presenting their papers on myriad topics. The day was split into four paper sessions: the first was about data analytics and the internet of things, the second was about mobile applications and miscellaneous information technology, the third, machine learning, and the final section focused on biometrics, security, optimizations, and knowledge representation. Each section included between nine and twelve papers, making for a busy day of learning.

Student Steven Porras with his research project PowerShell Forensics
Student Steven Porras with his research project PowerShell Forensics

The list of presentations is too long to include here, but you can check it out on Charles Tappert’s university page. Slideshows and papers are all available on the website, so be sure to check them out!

A hearty congratulations to all who presented this year – we look forward to seeing you again in 2018!

Read about last year’s record-breaking research day.

Student Carlo Clarke presented his research on Vulnerabilities within Wireless Protocols
Student Carlo Clarke presented his research on Vulnerabilities within Wireless Protocols

Record-setting success at Michael L. Gargano Research Day

The Seidenberg School opened its doors to the 14th edition of the Michael L. Gargano Research Day Conference on Friday, May 6th.

IMG_2775This student-faculty conference provides the Seidenberg community with an opportunity to share research.  This year’s event set a participation record: 42 papers published in the conference proceedings, including 60 doctoral, 84 masters, and 10 undergraduate student authors. Of these papers, over 25 were presented at the conference. From biometrics and security to knowledge representation and optimization, big data and the internet-of-things, the presentations covered problems in diverse domains including security, education and healthcare.

This signature Seidenberg School academic event could not be possible without the commitment and enthusiasm of computer science professor, and conference chair, Charles Tappert, PhD.

IMG_2783Dr. Tappert serves as research advisor to many doctoral students, and also runs undergraduate and graduate capstone courses on the Pleasantville campus.

Since this is an annual Seidenberg event, why not take part yourself next year? We will be looking for submissions in Spring ’17, so now is a good time to start!

The Michael L. Gargano Research Day is named after the late Seidenberg computer science professor,  Michael L. Gargano, a passionate researcher and valued research advisor, particularly to students in the doctoral program.

Pace University to host first ever Research Day

Pace University prides itself on helping students find prestigious internships that will give them skills for once they graduate – but for some students those skills come from working on projects within the school itself. University faculty and students at Pace have a long history of working on cutting edge research which contributes to their field and puts students at the forefront of their pe

Pace University prides itself on helping students find prestigious internships that will give them skills for once they graduate – but for some students those skills come from working on projects within the school itself. University faculty and students at Pace have a long history of working on cutting edge research which contributes to their field and puts students at the forefront of their peers. Be it computer science or chemistry or speech pathology the University is committed to providing its students with research experiences.

Provost Uday Sukhatme understands the importance of continuing this legacy of research and that’s why he is partnering with the Office of Sponsored Research and the Faculty Research Planning Committee to host the First Annual Pace Wide Research Day. The Research Day will be held in Pleasantville on Thursday April 25th from 10am to 3pm in the Gottesman and Butcher Suites. In New York the day will be on Tuesday April 30th from 10am to 3pm in the Student Union and the Schimmel Lobby.

Last year, Pace faculty submitted 141 proposals for external funding and received 97 external awards. The Pace Research Day will celebrate and recognize the faculty research, both funded and not funded. All faculty are encouraged to present the results of their current research undertaken by the faculty as well as jointly with their students. This will be a fantastic opportunity for attendees to see the wide array of research being undertaken at Pace at both the Pleasantville and New York City campuses.

The research will be displayed in books, posters and computer/tablets. There will be a light lunch and awards will be given to the most impressive projects. This will be a fantastic opportunity for faculty in different departments to see what work their colleagues are engaged in and to speak to students interested in doing research. Those interested in participating in the event should e-mail Mitsuko Rendon at mrendon@pace.edu

The Seidenberg School is sure to have a strong presence at the event with research initiatives such as the CyberSecurity Institute, The Computer Forensics Lab and The Robotics Lab. If you are interested in the research being undertaken at the Seidenberg School you can read about our research initiatives on our website.

Are you excited to see what research projects the University has been working on? Or will you be going to show off your own work? Tell us in the comments. And be sure to follow the Seidenberg School on Facebook, Twitter, or Google+ to get the latest updates about what’s happening at the school – research or otherwise.